Detroit Film Theatre


PIONEERS OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN CINEMA: ELEVEN P.M.

Saturday, February 04, 2017

3:00 PM

(US/1928—directed by Richard Maurice)

Produced in Detroit by little-known African-American Richard Maurice, Eleven P.M. is a surreal, dreamlike drama about a poor violinist (played by Maurice) who tries to protect an orphaned girl from a small-time hoodlum. (60 minutes)

plus

HELL-BOUND TRAIN

(US/1930—directed by James and Eloyce Gist)

Self-taught filmmakers, James and Eloyce Gist were African-American evangelists who used motion pictures as a tool of persuasion for their traveling ministry. This non-narrative visual catalog of sins of the Jazz Age, including dancing, drinking and gambling, is presided over by a horned devil. Shot using hand-held cameras and natural light, the surreal Hell-Bound Train features a newly composed score by Dr. Samuel Waymon, best known for his score for the 1973 cult classic Ganja and Hess. (50 minutes)

Admission to this screening is free of charge.
 

Black History Month programs are made possible by the generous support of Arn and Nancy Tellem.

The Detroit Film Theatre is supported by your millage investment in the DIA.