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Hummingbirds and Orchids Martin Johnson Heade
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Hummingbirds and Orchids (47.36) — Martin Johnson Heade

Lecture: On the Origins of Cities in Mesopotamia

Friday, December 08, 2006 |6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

  • For Adults

Above: Neo-Assyrian Cylinder Seal, Carnelian, 8th Century BC, Mesopotamia.
City of Detroit Purchase, Collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts, acc. no. 30.318

On the Origin of Cities in Mesopotamia:
Recent Excavations at Tell Brak, Northeastern Syria

Dr. Geoff Emberling
    
On the Origin of Cities in Mesopotamia: Recent Excavations 
     
at Tell Brak, Northeastern Syria

6:30-7:30 PM Lecture, DIA Lecture Hall
7:30-8:30 PM Cash bar, Great Hall

The first Mesopotamian cities have long been considered to be in Sumer (southern Iraq). However recent archaeological work in northern Mesopotamia (northeastern Syria) has shown the development of large urban centers were developing there as early as the cities of Sumer, by about 3500 BC. This lecture surveys the mid-fourth millennium city at Tell Brak, with discussions of the Eye Temple, a feasting hall, a hoard of precious jewelry, and a ceramic workshop.

A note on the speaker:

Geoff Emberling has been Director of the Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago since 2004. He received his BA in Anthropology from Harvard and his PhD in Anthropology from the University of Michigan with a dissertation on ethnicity in early Mesopotamia. He has held positions as Lecturer at the University of Copenhagen and Assistant Curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. From 1998 to 2004 he directed excavations at Tell Brak, a site in northeastern Syria that contains the remains of one of the earliest and largest Mesopotamian cities.