Museum InfoMedia Room

DIA exterior at night
DIA exterior at night

November brings special holiday Programs, new Hours at Detroit Institute of Arts: Beginning November 13 museum will be open on Tuesdays and 9 a.m. on weekdays

Monday, October 15, 2012

 

NOTE: THE MUSEUM WILL BE CLOSED THURSDAY, NOV. 22 FOR THANKSGIVING DAY


(Detroit)—Visitors will soon have more time to enjoy the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA). Beginning Tuesday, Nov. 13, the DIA will be open Tuesdays–Thursdays 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Fridays 9 a.m.–10 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Exhibitions now on view are Fabergé: The Rise and Fall, The Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for children – see www.dia.org); Picasso and Matisse: The DIA’s Prints and Drawings; and Hidden Treasures: An Experiment.


Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information, call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Wednesdays–Thursdays, 1 p.m.; Fridays, 1 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Sundays, noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, November 2, 9, 16 & 30, 6–9 p.m. —Artist Trading Cards: Learn about the history of trading cards while you create your own.
Saturdays, November 3, 10 & 17, Noon–4 p.m. —The Artable Egg: Transform egg-shaped materials in wood, plastic and paper into miniature works of art using beads, baubles and bling, a la Fabergé.
Sundays, November 4, 11 & 18, Noon–4 p.m. —Winter Counts: A winter count was used by certain Native American communities of the Northern Great Plains to record their histories and to keep track of the passage of years. Use leather and colorful markers as you create one of your own.


Special Thanksgiving Weekend Drop-In Workshops, November 23–25
Friday, November 23, Noon–4 p.m. —Tongue Depressor Puppets: Let your imagination soar when you use fabric, yarn, ribbon, and markers to create a simple puppet on a stick.
Saturday, November 24, Noon–4 p.m. —Rod Bug Puppets: Pieces of black and white foam board become whimsical bug like creatures on a stick when you add beads, colorful markers and pipe cleaners.
Sunday, November 25, Noon–4 p.m. —Finger Puppets: Use air-drying modeling compound, colorful wire and beads to make a simple puppet.

Thursday, November 1
Detroit Film Theatre: Twilight of the Tsars: A Child of the Big City: 7 p.m.
This 1914 silent film by Evegni Bauer traces a heroine’s steady progression from a poor innocent seamstress into a wealthy monster of depravity. Live piano accompaniment by David Drezin. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Friday Night Live, November 2
Music: Shuffle Concert: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
In a shuffle concert the audience selects the music to be played, choosing from more than 14 different styles, including baroque, classical, romantic, jazz, pop and Broadway.

Detroit Film Theatre: Bell Borba Aqui: 7 p.m.
For the past 35 years, Bel Borba has been transforming his 500-year-old hometown of Salvador, Brazil with an array of public art. Set to the rhythms of Brazil, Bel Borba Aqui introduces this one-man life-force who breathes new energy into the city he loves through his art. In English and Portuguese with English subtitles. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Stars in Shorts: 9:30 p.m.
This series of recent short films features a lineup of some of today’s most celebrated performers including Colin Firth, Lily Tomlin, Judi Dench, Jason Alexander and Keira Knightly, working in genres as varied as comedy, sci-fi, drama and musicals. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Saturday, November 3
DFT: The Story of Film, Parts 9 & 10: 3 p.m.
The Story of Film is a loosely chronological, 15-hour history of the art of motion pictures, presented over seven Saturdays. In this screening, Claudia Cardinale talks about working with Fellini, Lars von Tier reveals his admiration for Ingmar Bergman, and Bernardo Bertolucci remembers Pier Paolo Pasolini. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Detroit Film Theatre: Bell Borba Aqui: 7 p.m.
(See Nov. 2 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Stars in Shorts: 9:30 p.m.
(See Nov. 2 for details)

Family Sunday, November 4
Artist Demonstration: Charles Alexander: Noon–4 p.m.
Detroit native Charles Alexander demonstrates techniques of collage, mixed media, acrylics, watercolors, prints and 3D as he creates his images.

Sunday Music Bar: Mariachi Cora: 1 & 3 pm
Detroit’s Mariachi Cora performs its own brand of festive Mexican folk music.

Detroit Film Theatre: Bell Borba Aqui: 2 p.m.
(See Nov. 2 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Stars in Shorts: 4:30 p.m.
(See Nov. 2 for details)

Wednesday, November 7
Detroit Film Theatre: In Celebration of Windsor International Film Festival: 7 p.m.
This series of inventive and entertaining short films—half of them Canadian, half of them American —represent some of the most interesting live-action and animated work being done by both first-time and seasoned filmmakers. The audience can vote for its favorites, as will Windsor audiences, who will be seeing the same films. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Thursday, November 8
Detroit Film Theatre: Twilight of the Tsars: The Departure of a Great Old Man: 7 p.m.
This 1912 film dramatizes the account of Leo Tolstoy’s life, and includes documentary footage of real locations. Live piano accompaniment by David Drezin. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Friday Night Live, November 9
Music: NO CONCERT

Detroit Film Theatre: Marina Abromovic: The Artist is Present: 7 p.m.
Seductive, fearless and outrageous, Marina Abramovic has been redefining what art is for nearly 40 years. Using her body as a vehicle, pushing herself beyond her physical and mental limits, she creates challenging, shocking and moving performances. This documentary goes inside her world as she prepares for her most important moment to date: a major retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. It’s the chance to answer the question she’s been confronted with for four decades: “Why is this art?” Berlin Film Festival Audience Award. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Patience (After Sebald): 9:30 p.m.
This richly textured film on landscape, art, history, life and loss is an exploration of the work and influence of writer W. G. Sebald (1944–2001). Sebald was propelled to international acclaim with the publication of his 1992 book, The Emigrants. He followed with the revered The Rings of Saturn and Austerlitz. Today he is regarded as one of the most important post-war European authors, and his work has influenced many artists and filmmakers. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Saturday, November 10
Detroit Film Theatre: The Story of Film: Parts 11 & 12: 3 p.m.
The Story of Film is a loosely chronological, 15-hour history of the art of motion pictures, presented over seven Saturdays. The Story travels to Bollywood, Bruce Lee’s Hong Kong, California for the The Matrix and Beijing just before the Tiananmen crackdown. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Ford Second Sunday, November 11 – free general museum admission
Artist Demonstration: Silversmithing and Pewter Casting: Noon–4 p.m.
Watch examples of silversmithing and pewter casting by the Mt. Clemens Gem and Lapidary Society.

Sunday Music Bar: NO CONCERT

Detroit Film Theatre: The Tempest: 2 p.m.
Christopher Plummer stars as Prospero, the banished Duke of Milan, marooned on an island with his daughter, Miranda. Plummer brings the language of Shakespeare vividly to life, while director Des McAnuff conjures up Prospero’s mystical isle. Recorded live at the 2010 Stratford festival. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Marina Abromovic: The Artist is Present: 6 p.m.
(See Nov. 9 for details)

Thursday, November 15
Lecture: Fabergé and Cartier: An Epic Rivalry: 6 p.m.
The immense success of Fabergé, arguably the greatest jeweler of all times, led to emulations and forgeries by French jewelers, particularly Cartier. Géza von Habsburg, consulting Fabergé curator, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, tells stories of their rivalry. Tickets, which include the lecture, reception and private viewing of Fabergé: The Rise and Fall, The Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, are $75. For tickets call 313-833-1720. Sponsored by Visiting Committee of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Detroit Film Theatre: Twilight of the Tsars: High Society: 7 p.m.
A Life For a Life (1916), based on a novel by Georges Ohnet, was compared to the work of D.W. Griffith, and ias accompanied by a comic short film Ruined by a Corset (1916) made by Czech-born comedian Anton Feriner. Live piano accompaniment by David Drezin. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Friday Night Live, November 16
Detroit Film Theatre: The British Television Advertising Awards: 7 p.m.
Unlike any other TV advertisers in the world, Britain produces imaginative, witty, technically sophisticated cutting-edge commercials. Each year’s collection of top BTAA prizewinners are showcased at a limited number of U.S. museums. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

DIA Moment: Puppetslam (adults only): 8 p.m.
This puppetry-for-adults event features three to four puppet scenes by a variety of puppet artists.

Saturday, November 17
Class: The Potter’s Wheel for Adults and Children (ages 5 and older with adult): 10–11:30 a.m., 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m., 1–2:30 p.m. and 2–3:30 p.m.
Try the potter’s wheel in a small class with plenty of individual guidance. Participants use their own wheels for one hour of hands-on clay time. Projects will be fired for pick-up at a later date. Each class is limited to five people. Preregistration and prepayment is required. Cost: members $18, nonmembers $24. To register, call 313-833-4005.

Meet Me at the DIA: A Program for People with Early-Stage Dementia and Their Caregivers: 10:30 a.m.–noon
People with early-stage dementia (including Alzheimer’s) and their caregivers are invited to participate in gallery discussions about art led by DIA staff and volunteers with expertise in this area. Participants are made to feel welcome and comfortable, and discussions are based on the observations and connections made by the group. The program provides opportunities for social engagement and intellectual stimulation in a safe, inspiring environment. Everyone is encouraged to contribute to the discussions; participants leave the DIA with small prints of DIA artworks so conversations can be continued. Meet Me at the DIA is modeled after a successful program at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Members $17 per couple, nonmembers $20 per couple. Register at tickets.dia.org. Sponsored by HealthPlus of Michigan

Detroit Film Theatre: the Story of Film, Parts 13, 14 and 15: 3 p.m.
This is the last in a series on the history of the art of motion pictures. This part of the story enters a golden age during the 1990s in Iran (Abbas Kiarostami), Japan (Shinya Tsukamoto), France (Claire Denis), America (David Lynch) and Russia (Alexander Sokurov). The story ends with a glimpse of films of the future. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Detroit Film Theatre: The British Television Advertising Awards: 7 p.m.
(See Nov. 16 for details)

Family Sunday, November 18
Sunday Music Bar: Royal Garden Trio: 1 & 3 p.m.
The Royal Garden Trio, whose music is featured on the DIA’s commercials, performs their interpretation of 1930s-era Stephane Grapelli-Django Rheinhardt hot jazz. The group is made up of guitarist Brian Delaney, Tom Bogardus on tenor guitar and clarinet and Michael Karoub on cello.

Family Performance: Reg Pettibone: 2 p.m.
Reg Pettibone, a Native American Champion Dancer for the Ho-Chunk Nation, presents traditional myths and dances. With traditional background and upbringing, Reg, his daughter Coral Sky and his wife, Marca, from the Paiute Nation, provide an understanding of Native American culture through dance, song, narration and a display of artifacts with a strong environmental emphasis.

Detroit Film Theatre: The British Television Advertising Awards: 2 p.m.
(See Nov. 16 for details)

Thursday, November 22 – CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING DAY

Friday Night Live, November 23
Puppet Performance: National Marionette Theater presents Peter and the Wolf: 2 p.m.
Sergei Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf has enchanted audiences since its premier in 1936. Based on the original Russian folktale, National Marionette Theatre’s version features the music from Prokofiev’s orchestral score combined with stunning scenery and hand-crafted marionettes. Set in turn-of-the-century Russia, this classic tale is about bravery, curiosity, ingenuity and "listening to your Grandfather."

Music: TwoSense: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Pianist Lisa Moore and cellist Ashley Bathgate established their reputations individually as new-music interpreters through their work with the Bang on a Can All Stars. They have formed TwoSense, a duo devoted to performing the latest works and commissions by contemporary composers and 20th-century literature for cello and piano.

Lecture: Fourth Friday for Friends, Andy Warhol’s Fright Wig: 7 pm.
Andy Warhol’s obsession with celebrity is most revealing in his self-portraits, including his 1986 Fright Wig, on loan from the Andy Warhol Museum through April 2013. Warhol presents himself as spectral: his neon blue head, shock of hair, and paint splatter appear as a disembodied, free-floating mask or skull. Made at a time when many of Warhol’s friends were dying of AIDS, this canvas was considered a harbinger of death. Rebecca Hart, DIA associate curator of contemporary art, will discuss Fright Wig, Warhol’s cult of celebrity and his sense of mortality. Sponsored by the Friends of Modern and Contemporary Art

Detroit Film Theatre: Kumaré: 7 p.m.
Sri Kumaré is a guru from the East who has come to America to spread his teachings. He finds devoted students who embrace him as a true spiritual force. But Kumaré is not real; he is a filmmaker from New Jersey named Vikram Gandhi who wanted to see if he could pull this deception off. Gandi discovers that he cares for his followers, and his growing sense of responsibility toward them forces him to look inward as he contemplates the risks and rewards of revealing his “true self.” Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Neighboring Sounds: 9:30 p.m.
Neighboring Sounds peers into the lives of a group of middle-class families residing on a quiet street in Recife, Brazil. The viewer is never quite sure where things are headed, even as the film builds imperceptibly toward its knockout payoff. In Portuguese with English subtitles. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Saturday, November 24
Puppet Performance: National Marionette Theater presents Peter and the Wolf: 2 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: DFT 101: The Graduate: 4 p.m.
Dustin Hoffman’s Benjamin Braddock, adrift after college, is craftily seduced by a woman of his parents’ generation: Anne Bancroft’s icily assured friend-of-the-family Mrs. Robinson. It’s understandable that Ben’s dream girl, played by Katharine Ross, is startled to learn that he’s been sleeping with her mother. Cost $5. Free to DIA members.

Detroit Film Theatre: Kumaré: 7 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Neighboring Sounds: 9:30 p.m.
(See Nov.23 for details)

Family Sunday, November 25
Brunch with Bach: Sergei Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf: 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m.
Sergei Prokofiev’s classic tale for narrator and orchestra is arranged for wind ensemble and piano featuring the Detroit Chamber Winds and narrated by Alex Trajano. Tickets: Brunch and Concert, 1:30 p.m.; concert only, $35; Continental Breakfast and concert, 11 a.m. performance only, $20; concert only: $15. Call 313-833-4005 or visit www.dia.org.

Puppet Performance: National Marionette Theater presents Peter and the Wolf: 2 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Kumaré: 2 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Neighboring Sounds: 4:30 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Thursday, November 29
Detroit Film Theatre: Twilight of the Tsars: End of an Era: 7 p.m.
Russian directors were eager to exploit the eight months between 1917’s revolutions of February and October. The Revolutionary and For Luck (both 1917) combined themes of unrest with a rich dose of daring romance. Live piano accompaniment by David Drezin. Tickets: $7.50; seniors and students, $6.50; free for DIA members.

Friday Night Live, November 30
Music: Cut Time Players: 7 & 8:30 pm
One of Detroit's favorite classical music bands, the Cut Time Players plays music from pre-revolutionary Russia. The performance includes music by Modest Mussorgsky, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Pyotr Tchaikovsky and others.

Detroit Film Theatre: Neighboring Sounds: 7 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Kumaré: 9:45 p.m.
(See Nov. 23 for details)

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Beginning Tuesday, Nov. 13, the DIA will be open Tuesdays–Thursdays 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Fridays 9 a.m.–10 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17, and free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties and DIA members. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from the City of Detroit and residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.