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DIA docent tour
Docent tour

September at Detroit Institute of Arts brings live Performance by Yo La Tengo, Outdoor Family Programs and More

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

(Detroit)—With music, artist demonstrations, puppet performances and more, there’s so much to see and do inside and outside the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA). The special exhibition Ellsworth Kelly Prints, which is free with museum admission, ends Sept. 8.

Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information, call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Fridays, 1 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Sundays, noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Accordion Books: The accordion book is one of the most versatile and easiest books to make. Make your own then decorate it using markers, ribbon and beads.
Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m. Initial That!: Use a variety of colorful gel pens and markers on foam board as you artfully design your own monogram.
Sundays, Noon–4 p.m. Mobiles: Make a simple mobile using yarn, colorful board and markers.

Family Sunday, September 1
Artist Demonstration: Greg Oberle, Chalk Drawings: 1–4 p.m.
Illustrator Greg Oberle uses a variety of chalk techniques to create a large drawing near the John R entrance on the DIA East Lawn

Detroit Film Theatre: Hear and There: 2 p.m.
Returning home to a small mountain village in Mexico after years of working in the U.S., Pedro finds his daughters older and more distant, though his wife is ecstatic to have him back. He hopes to make a better life with his family, but work remains scarce, and the temptation to return north, a place of hope that’s always on his mind, remains strong. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp

Detroit Film Theatre: André Gregory: Before and After Dinner: 4:30 p.m.
A brilliant and funny raconteur, André Gregory discusses the making of My Dinner With André (1981), written by and starring Gregory and Wallace Shawn. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp

Friday Night Live, September 6
Music: La Bottine Souriante: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
This 10-piece Quebec roots ensemble is hailed for its innovative arrangements and the wild spirit of its live shows. La Bottine Souriante (smiling work-boot) stays clear of popular trends and folk purism, offering music of depth and substance with the freedom to let the good times roll.

Detroit Film Theatre: Hannah Arendt: 7 p.m.
This film is an insightful biopic of the influential German-Jewish philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt. Arendt’s reporting on the 1961 trial of Nazi Adolf Eichmann in The New Yorker—controversial both for her portrayal of Eichmann and the Jewish councils—introduced her now-famous concept of the “Banality of Evil.” In English and German with English subtitles. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp

Detroit Film Theatre: Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie: 9:30 p.m.
This eye-opening documentary dissects the mind and motivation of television’s most notorious agitator, controversial talk-show host Morton Downey Jr. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp

Saturday, September 7
Detroit Film Theatre: Hannah Arendt: 7 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie: 9:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Ford Second Sunday, September 8–Free general museum admission
Music in Kresge Court: Pianist Charles Boles: 1–4 p.m.

Detroit Film Theatre: Hannah Arendt: 2 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie: 4:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Storyteller Performance: Judy Sima: 2 p.m.
Judy Sima presents “Books Come Alive,” a program featuring some of the best known stories in children’s literature.

Friday Night Live, September 13
Music: Joan Soriano and La Familia: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Joan Soriano and La Familia perform authentic bachata, a genre that originated in the Dominican Republic. What distinguishes Soriano from other bachateros is his devotion to bachata’s cultural roots. La Familia features three of Joan’s 15 siblings performing music from their native Monte Plata.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Wall: 7 p.m.
Martina Gedeck stars in this tale of survival set in a beautiful Austrian mountain landscape. Gedeck plays an unnamed character who suddenly finds herself cut off from all human contact when an invisible, unyielding wall surrounds the countryside where she is vacationing. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp

Detroit Film Theatre: Hannah Arendt: 9:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Saturday, September 14
Detroit Film Theatre: The Wall: 7 p.m.
(See Sept. 13 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Hannah Arendt: 9:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Family Sunday, September 15
Music in Kresge Court: Pianist Buddy Budson: 1–4 p.m.

Family Performance on the Lawn: Robert B. Jones, Musician and Storyteller: 2 p.m.
This music and storytelling program on the South Lawn showcases the relationship between America's folk music and the country’s historic and social changes. The program begins with early spirituals from the 1840s and progresses through the songs of the Underground Railroad, the Industrial Revolution, early blues and country, jazz, bluegrass, gospel and R&B, continuing into Rap and Hip-Hop.

Lecture: Barkley Hendricks: Birth of the Cool: 2 p.m.
Trevor Schoonmaker, Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher curator of contemporary art at the Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University, discusses Barkley Hendricks’ distinctive, large-scale portraits of everyday people made in the 1960s. Schoonmaker organized a critically acclaimed exhibition in 2008 on Hendricks, which was the first painting retrospective of the artist’s 50-year career. Sponsored by Friends of African and African American Art

Detroit Film Theatre: The Wall: 2 p.m.
(See Sept. 13 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Hannah Arendt: 4:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 6 for details)

Thursday, September 19
DIA Moment: Sam Green and Yo La Tengo present The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller: 7 & 9:30 p.m.
Buckminster Fuller, 20th-century futurist, architect, engineer and inventor, experimented for 50 years to find out what one person can do on behalf of humanity. This “live documentary,” a collaboration between Academy–Award nominated filmmaker Sam Green and the legendary indie band Yo La Tengo, explores Fuller’s utopian vision of radical social change through design revolution. Green will narrate a series of live clips and found footage while Yo La Tengo performs their original score live. The event helps kick off the Detroit Design Festival and is made possible with support from the Reva Stocker Endowment Fund. Tickets are free, but must be reserved in advance at www.dia.org or by calling 313-833-4005.

Friday Night Live, September 20
Music: Stephane Wrembel: 7 p.m. only
Jazz guitarist Stephane Wrembel calls his music “gypsy jam,” a hybrid of world music dominated by his gypsy guitar. He performs with Dave Speranza on bass, Davis Langlois on washboard, Nick Anderson on drums and Koran Hasanagic on rhythm guitar.

Detroit Film Theatre: Good Ol’ Freda: 7 p.m.
Freda Kelly was just a shy Liverpudlian teenager when she was asked to work for a local band hoping to make it big. Though she had no concept of how far they would go, Freda had faith in The Beatles from the beginning, and The Beatles had faith in her. History notes that The Beatles were together for 10 years, but Freda Kelly worked for them for 11. In this new documentary, Freda tells her stories for the first time in 50 years. One of few films with the support of the living Beatles, it offers an insider perspective on the band that changed the music industry and popular culture forever. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp

Puppet Performance: Open Eye Theater presents Two Wheel Parade of Oddities: 8 p.m.
DIA South Lawn
Open Eye Theater presents Parade of Oddities on the South Lawn, a two-wheel tour with stops in various locations around the city, each featuring a series of vignettes with small trick marionettes, crankies, bells, and recorded sound. These traveling puppet shows on a tandem bike help kick off Tour D’Troit!

Detroit Film Theatre: Triplets of Belleville: 9:30 p.m.
When her grandson is kidnapped during the Tour de France, Madame Souza and her pooch Bruno team up with the Belleville Sisters, an aged song-and-dance team from the days of Fred Astaire, to rescue him. Free admission.

Saturday, September 21
Meet Me at the DIA: A Program for People with Early-Stage Dementia and Their Caregivers: 10:30 a.m.–noon
People with early-stage dementia (including Alzheimer’s) and their caregivers can participate in gallery discussions about art led by DIA staff and volunteers with expertise in this area. Participants are made to feel welcome and comfortable, and discussions are based on the observations and connections made by the group. The program provides opportunities for social engagement and intellectual stimulation in a safe, inspiring environment. All are encouraged to contribute to the discussions; participants are given small prints of DIA artworks so conversations can be continued. To register go to www.dia.org or call 313-833-4005.

Lecture: From the Fifth Vizier's Story to the Gifts of Timur: The Artist Sravana in Akbar's Atelier: 2 p.m.
Sonya Rhie Quintanilla, curator of Indian and Southeast Asian Art at the Cleveland Museum of 
Art, looks into the early development of imperial Mughal painting through the work of one court artist for India's third Mughal emperor. Sponsored by Asian & Islamic Art Forum

Detroit Film Theatre: Good Ol’ Freda: 7 p.m.
(See Sept. 20 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: The Wall: 9:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 13 for details)

Family Sunday, September 22
Puppet Performance: Open Eye Theater presents Two Wheel Parade of Oddities: 2 p.m.
(See Sept. 20 for details)

Sunday Music Bar: Leticia Gómez-Tagle: 1 & 3 p.m.
Classically trained Mexican pianist Leticia Gómez-Tagle performs as a part of an ongoing collaboration between the DIA and the Consulate of Mexico featuring performers from Mexico.

Detroit Film Theatre: Good Ol’ Freda: 2 p.m.
(See Sept. 20 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: The Wall: 4:30 p.m.
(See Sept. 13 for details)

Friday Night Live, September 27
Music: Lisa Moore: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Pianist Lisa Moore combines powerful technique with vivid theatricality. Equally at home in the masterworks of the past and the present, Moore’s performances feature texts, songs, whistles and screams that mix with virtuosic cascades of pianistic brilliance.

Detroit Film Theatre: Intolerance: 7 p.m.
This silent 1916 film by D.W. Griffith is considered one of the greatest movies ever made. Intolerance consists of four distinct, but parallel, stories—intercut with increasing frequency as the film builds to a climax—that demonstrate humankind's persistent intolerance throughout the ages. The film sets up moral and psychological connections among the different stories and covers approximately 2,500 years: the ancient “Babylonian” story (539 BC); the Biblical “Judean” story (c. 27 AD); the Renaissance “French” story (1572); and the American “Modern” story (c. 1914). The sets and art direction would be considered jaw-dropping even today; the Babylonian sequence remains an indelible cinematic icon. This newly restored, full-length version features original color tinting and toning and a lush musical score by Carl Davis, performed by the Luxembourg Symphony Orchestra. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp 

Saturday, September 28
Detroit Film Theatre: Intolerance: 7 p.m.
(See Sept. 27 for details)

Family Sunday, September 29
Music in Kresge Court: Pianist Cliff Monear 1–4 p.m.

Storytelling Performance: Rosie Chapman: 2 p.m.
Rosie Chapman narrates African and African American stories accompanied by traditional instruments that audience members can play.

Detroit Film Theatre: Intolerance: 7 p.m.
(See Sept. 27 for details)

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17, and free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties and DIA members. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.