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DIA exterior at night
DIA exterior at night

March at Detroit Institute of Arts features opening of Samurai: Beyond the Sword

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Contact: Pamela Marcil (313) 833-7899  pmarcil@dia.org


(Detroit)—The much-anticipated exhibition Samurai: Beyond the Sword opens March 9 and joins three other exhibitions currently on view: Let Me Show You What I Saw: American Views on City and County, 1912–1963; Foto Europa, 1850 to Present; and Balance of Power: A Throne for an African Prince, which ends March 16.

Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information, call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Fridays, 1 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Sundays, noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Scrolls
Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m. Miniature Paper Hats
Sundays, Noon–4 p.m. Watercolor Postcards

Saturday, March 1
Detroit Film Theatre: Alfred Hitchcock’s The Farmer’s Wife: 3 p.m.
In this 1928 silent comedy a widowed landowner decides to marry again by compiling a list of all the eligible women in the neighborhood, wooing each one—with spectacularly unfortunate results. Accompanied by David Drazin on piano. Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Lecture: Shadows of Ourselves: Photography and the American Civil War: 4:30 p.m.
Jeff Rosenheim, curator in charge at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, talks about the rich legacy of photographs taken during the Civil War: intimate pictures of armed soldiers, from both the North and the South, preparing to meet their destiny; haunting views of battlefields strewn with human remains; and precious records of emancipated slaves posing for their first portraits. Sponsored by Associates of the American Wing

Detroit Film Theatre: Bethlehem: 7 p.m.
Recruited as an informant by the Israeli secret service, a Palestinian teenager is caught in a double bind when he discovers that his employers may be planning action against his brother, a dedicated fighter in the Palestinian resistance. In Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Selfish Giant: 9:30 p.m.
In the working-class town of Bradford, England, 13-year-old Arbor and his friend Swifty, both expelled from school, fall in with a nefarious local scrap metal dealer who tests the limits of the boys’ friendship. Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Family Sunday, March 2
Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Christian Dragone: 1–4 p.m.

Detroit Film Theatre: Bethlehem: 2 p.m.
(See March 1 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: The Selfish Giant: 4:30 p.m.
(See March 1 for details)

Friday Night Live, March 7
Music: Alberto Rojo Trio
: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
The Alberto Rojo Trio plays traditional Argentinean folk songs, new compositions, jazz and contemporary improvisations. The trio includes Alberto Rojo on guitar, Michael Gould on percussion and Jordan Schug on bass.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Rocket: 7:30 p.m.
Ahlo, a 10-year-old Laotian boy believed by his village to bring bad luck and poverty, leads his family and some misfit friends on a journey to find a new home. Ahlo decides to enter the most lucrative and dangerous competition of the year: the Rocket Festival. Building his giant rocket without the benefit of technical knowhow, Ahlo is obsessed with triumphing over impossible odds. In Lao with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Bethlehem: 9:30 p.m.
(See March 1 for details)

Saturday, March 8
Detroit Film Theatre: The Ring: 4 p.m.
Hitchcock’s 1927 silent film is a love triangle set in the world of boxing and shows Hitchcock’s fascination with the minute details of the sport. Hitchcock attended a number of championship bouts at London’s Albert Hall, which appears in the film. Filled with visual tricks and impressive sets, The Ring hints at the visual spectacles that Hitchcock would create in the following decades. Accompanied by David Drazin on piano. Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Rocket: 7 p.m.
(See March 7 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Bethlehem: 9:30 p.m.
(See March 1 for details)

Family Sunday, March 9
Sunday Music Bar: Harumi Omitsu
: 1 & 3 p.m.
Koto player Harumi Omitsu performs traditional Japanese music in conjunction with the exhibition Samurai: Beyond the Sword.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Rocket: 2 p.m.
(See March 7 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Bethlehem: 4:30 p.m.
(See March 1 for details)

Wednesday, March 12
Lecture: Innocent and Rational Enjoyments
: 6:30 p.m.
At the end of the War of 1812, Boston cabinetmakers met the growing demand for furniture in the latest British styles. Robert Mussey, a leading expert on early American furniture, argues that the best work by these Boston makers was just as good as the best pieces made by Duncan Phyfe in New York. Sponsored by Associates of the American Wing

Friday Night Live, March 14
Music: Rita Hosking
: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Rita Hosking is a singer songwriter from Northern California whose styles include Americana, folk, bluegrass and mountain music. She will perform music from her latest recording, Little Boats, which includes songs with characters and images of the mountains and rural west.

Family Sunday, March 16
Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Robert Budson
: 1–4 p.m.

Artist Demonstration: Japanese Tea Ceremony: 1 & 3 p.m.
Members of the Japanese Women’s Club, in association with the Japanese Consulate of Detroit, demonstrate the intricate rituals of the tea ceremony.

Thursday-Saturday, March 20–23
Detroit Film Theatre: Freep Film Festival
T: (screening times TBA)
The Detroit Free Press’ Freep Film Festival focuses on documentaries about Detroit and Michigan that address issues facing the region and celebrate what makes us unique. The festival's lineup is to be announced. When information becomes available, it will be at www.freepfilmfestival.com and www.dia.org.

Friday Night Live, March 21
Music: TBD: 7 & 8:30 p.m.

Family Sunday, March 23
Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Mick Dobday
: 1–4 p.m.

Storytelling: Kuniko Yamamoto: 2 p.m.
Charming Japanese folktales, combined with traditional musical instruments, masks, origami and mime portray the culture of Japan.

Friday Night Live, March 28
Music: Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble
: 7 & 8:30 pm
The nationally recognized New Music Ensemble at Grand Valley State University is known for bringing audiences the most significant music of our time. From landmark compositions of the 20th century to the most recent works of this century, their concerts are stimulating and unpredictable. The group has been profiled in Newsweek, the New York Times, and Billboard Magazine, and featured on NPR’s Weekend Edition, All Things Considered and WNYC's Radiolab.

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 7 p.m.
It’s the early 1990s in Tbilisi, the capital of the newly independent Georgia, following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The country is facing violence of all kinds: war on the Black Sea coast and recurring attempts at vigilante justice that plague society. But for schoolgirls Eka and Natia, 14-year-old inseparable friends, life just unfolds: in the street, at school, with friends or elder sisters. For these two girls in bloom, life holds surprises at every turn. In Georgian with English subtitles Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Child’s Pose: 9:30 p.m.
This drama of social insight and psychological realism is about a well-to-do Bucharest architect determined to keep her 30-something deadbeat son out of jail after a deadly car crash. The movie provides a caustic look into the corrupt heart of the Eastern European bourgeoisie and twists into an ambiguous study of obsessive motherly love. In Romanian with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50 and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Saturday, March 29
Artist Demonstration: Society of American Period Furniture Makers: 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Watch a demonstration of traditional furniture construction techniques and learn how they were used to make pieces in the DIA’s American art collection. Each 30-minute demonstration is followed by a short gallery tour.

Detroit Film Theatre: Saturday Animation Club: Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind: 3 p.m.
Nausicaa is set in a devastated future world decimated by atmospheric poisons and swarming with gigantic insects. It tells the story of a young princess, both brave and innocent, whose love for all living things and passionate determination to understand the processes of nature lead her into terrible danger, sacrifice, and eventual triumph. Tickets are $5.

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 7 p.m.
(See March 28 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Child’s Pose: 9:30 p.m.
(See March 28 for details)

Sunday, March 30
Artist Demonstration: Society of American Period Furniture Makers
: 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
(See March 29 for details)

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Stefan Kukurugya: 1–4 p.m.

Lecture: Fashion in 19th-Century Zanzibar, the Paris of the Swahili Coast: 2 p.m.
In 1880, when Britain abolished slavery in Zanzibar, forced laborers were freed from the clove plantations, which initiated a revolution in dress. Sidney Kasfir, professor emerita, Emory University, examines how concubines, previously high-status slaves, led the way in developing new fashions to express their identities as free women and to loosen the tight strictures formerly imposed upon elite Zanzibari women. Sponsored by Friends of African and African American Art

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 2 p.m.
(See March 28 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Child’s Pose: 4:30 p.m.
(See March 28 for details)

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17, and free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties and DIA members. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.