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April at Detroit Institute of Arts Special Spring Break art-making activities part of April fun

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

(Detroit)—In addition to a variety of activities for all ages, exhibitions on view include: Samurai: Beyond the Sword, Let Me Show You What I Saw: American Views on City and County, 1912-1963, and Foto Europa, 1850 to the Present, on view through April 27.

Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information, call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Fridays, 1 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Sundays, noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Celebration Masks: Create a colorful carnival mask using feathers, ribbon, glitter and more.
Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m. Cylinder Seals: Seals were used by people in Sumeria (present day Iraq) as a signature and to prove ownership.  Carve a simple wax crayon to make your own personal seal.
Sundays, Noon–4 p.m. The Artable Egg: Transform a variety of egg-shaped materials, into miniature works of art.

Special Spring Break Drop-in Workshops: Musical Instruments April 22–25 
Tuesday, April 22, 11–3 p.m. Sistrums: Sistrums are sacred rattles carried by royal women during ceremonies in ancient Egypt. Create your own simple version.
Wednesday, April 23, 11–3 p.m. Kalimbas: Make a simple version of this West African instrument using tongue depressors, scrap wood and colored markers.
Thursday, April 24, 11–3 p.m. Rattles: Small containers and boxes morph into fantastic percussion instruments when dried beans, rice, feathers and fun papers are added. 
Friday, April 25, 11–3 p.m. Tambourines: Learn about the history of this percussion instrument and make a simple version of your own.

Wednesday, April 2
Detroit Film Theatre: Il Gioielliono (The Jewel): 6 p.m.
Il Gioiellino is a tale of Italy’s largest corporate fraud. Ernesto Botta is a disagreeable accountant at the Rastelli's family-owned agribusiness, which is quoted on the stock exchange and has launched into new international markets. Reckless and irresponsible management inevitably leads the company to the verge of bankruptcy, but Botta has a plan for inflating the company's financial statements, thereby pulling himself from the morass. In Italian with English subtitles.  Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Friday Night Live, April 4
Music: Musicians from the Tuesday Musicale Student League: 7 & 8:30 p.m. 
The Tuesday Musicale Student League consists of classical musicians between the ages of 12 and 19. They meet once a month to perform for each other, prepare for competitions and for careers in classical music performance. The very best of this group will play a wide range of classical music.

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 7 p.m.
This documentary, shot from 1968–73, follows an elderly couple living on a farmstead in the hills of Burgundy, France. It is an ode to the beauty of rural France, the simplicity of daily peasant life, and the nearly wordless intimacy of a lifelong relationship. In French with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 9:30 p.m.
Life holds surprises at every turn for two girls in the early 1990s in the newly independent Georgia, following the collapse of the Soviet Union,, including friends dealing with early marriage and disillusioned love. In Georgian with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Saturday, April 5
Lecture: Martial Arts: Civil and Military Interactions in Ming Dynasty China: 2 p.m.
Professor Kathleen Ryor of Carleton College will talk about how in Ming dynasty China military men often participated broadly in scholarly and artistic activities, while many influential literati actively engaged in pursuits associated with the warrior class. Sponsored by Asian & Islamic Art Forum

Detroit Film Theatre: The Sword of Doom: 3 p.m.
In the 1860s, the savage behavior of an outcast samurai leaves him little choice other than to make his living as a paid assassin. His fearsome authority is challenged, however—and his life placed in jeopardy—when he makes an enemy of the only samurai who is his equal as a swordsman. In Japanese with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 7 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Family Sunday, April 6
Artist Demonstration: Ikebana, the Art of Flower Arranging: Noon–4 p.m.
Members of the Ikebana International Detroit chapter illustrate the principles and practice behind the art of traditional Japanese flower arranging. 

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Pam Wise: 1–4 p.m.
Pianist Pam Wise performs R&B and jazz standards. 

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 2 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 4:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Thursday, April 11
Lecture: Charles E. Burchfield: Inventive Virtuoso: 7 p.m.
Nancy Weekly, curator, Burchfield Penney Art Center, SUNY Buffalo, talks about artist Charles E. Burchfield, who has been identified as a naturalist, realist, modernist, romantic and transcendentalist. He pioneered watercolor techniques and invented symbols to convey emotions and sensations in his artworks. Burchfield’s range of interests, passionate devotion to nature and cyclical interpretation of subjects keeps his work fascinating to audiences today. Sponsored by Forum for Prints, Drawings, and Photographs

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Friday Night Live, April 11
Music: Mr. B’s Blues and Boogie Piano Celebration: 7 & 8:30 p.m. 
Mr. B stages his annual Blues and Boogie Piano Celebration in Ann Arbor each year. This year the DIA is host to an additional evening of Boogie Woogie piano featuring Mr. B and German pianist Axel Zwingenberger. Boogie Woogie is a profound, expressive and powerful style of piano playing, firmly rooted in the Blues and played here by two masters of the style.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 7 p.m.
Some of the most entertaining and creative examples of British filmmaking are found in their incomparable television advertising. Britain’s unique, visually audacious Mad Men consistently fashion imaginative, witty, technically sophisticated cutting-edge productions that have been the earliest showcases for soon-to-be celebrated filmmakers. (Short films of varying lengths, total running time approximately 150 minutes). Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Saturday, April 12
Detroit Film Theatre: 13 ASSASSINS: 3 p.m.
Set near the end of the feudal era, 13 Assassins is the story of a group of unemployed samurai recruited to bring down a sadistic lord and prevent him from ascending to the throne. In Japanese with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 7 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Family Sunday, April 13
Artist Demonstration: Toby Millman, Printmaker: Noon–4 p.m.
Toby Millman demonstrates the intaglio printing techniques that have earned her images wide acclaim.

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Stefan Kukurugya: 1–4 p.m.
Pianist Stefan Kukurugya performs jazz, pop, R&B, and classical standards.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 2 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 4:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Thursday, April 17
Lecture: The Art of the Photobook: 7 p.m.
The art of photography has long been associated with the photobook — a publication envisioned by photographers as a work of art in and of itself. Aperture photobook editor Denise Wolff discusses the history of the photobook and her contributions to the field. Sponsored by Forum for Prints, Drawings and Photographs and Amerisure

Friday Night Live, April 18
Music: A Story of Floating Weeds featuring music by Alex di Grassi: 7 p.m.
Alex de Grassi was commissioned by the New York Guitar Festival to compose and perform his original score for Yasusjiro Ozu’s 1934 silent film A Story of Floating Weeds. The score is for acoustic guitar, which suggests the sound of the koto, a Japanese harp-like instrument. This classic tale is the story of a travelling actor who returns to a small town where he reunites with his former lover and their illegitimate son, which causes endless complications, including the wrath of his current mistress. Free.

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 9:30 p.m.
Blending an avant-garde vision with the traditions of the suspense thriller, the exciting new British film artist Joanna Hogg has created a mesmerizing, minimalist, intensely character-driven chronicle of a married, middle-aged couple, both artists, living and working in their architecturally unique London home. Hogg’s cleverly labyrinthine story structure mirrors the nooks and crannies of the film’s setting, eventually implicating the viewer in the movie’s mystery. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Saturday, April 19
Detroit Film Theatre: Yojimbo: 3 p.m.
The great Toshiro Mifune is a masterless samurai who wanders into a village terrorized by two equally evil, constantly warring factions. Seeing a way to turn the situation to his advantage, Mifune decides to secretly sell his services as a master sworsdsman to both sides, resulting in a tidal wave of apocalyptic swordplay. Remade by Italy’s Sergio Leone as A Fistful of Dollars. In Japanese with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 7 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 9:30 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Family Sunday, April 20
Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Cliff Monear: 1–4 p.m.
Pianist Cliff Monear performs jazz and pop standards.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 4:30 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 2 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Wednesday, April 23
Lecture: Skyscraper Urbanism: The Singer Building in Context: 6:30 p.m.
New York’s Singer Building, the world’s tallest building when completed in 1908, defied the rules of real estate and skyscraper construction. Inspired by the DIA’s recent acquisition of the Singer Building Grille, Hilary Ballon, New York University professor, puts this unusual building in historical context and explains how it modeled a new, influential approach to skyscraper urbanism. Sponsored by Associates of the American Wing
Friday Night Live, April 25
Music: The Blueflowers: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Detroit band the Blueflowers are led by songwriting duo Tony Hamera and Kate Hinote. Their songs contain elements of Folk-noir, Americana, 60s girl-pop, folk and psychadelia. The Blueflowers released their third and most ambitious recording, Stealing the Moon, in 2012, which has the feel of vintage Roy Orbison and the Zombies recordings, as well as the modern sounds of Neko Case and Nick Cave. 

Detroit Film Theatre: Faust: 7 p.m.
From the visionary director of Russian Ark comes a stunning, hallucinatory adaptation of Goethe’s play about a man whose quest to transcend human boundaries leads him to sell his soul to the devil. One of the most popular legends in western literature, the story has surfaced in many forms; Sokurov’s phantasmagoric spectacle conjures the essence of all of them. In German with English Subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 9:45 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Saturday, April 26
Detroit Film Theatre: The 46th Michigan Student Film & Video Festival: 10 a.m.
The Michigan Student Film & Video Festival is unique in the nation for providing a public venue for the work of students in grades K–12, as well as giving recognition and significant awards to young media artists. Now in its 46th year, the festival is presented by Digital Arts, Film & Television and co-sponsored by the Detroit Film Theatre and supported by the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs. 

Lecture: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery: The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia: 2 p.m.
In May 2012, the Barnes Foundation opened its downtown Philadelphia doors after a controversial move from its original home in suburban Merion. Tod Williams, principal, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, discusses the design for the new building, conceived as a “gallery in a garden and a garden in a gallery.” Sponsored by the Dr. Coleman Mopper Memorial Endowment Fund in conjunction with the European Paintings Council and the Visiting Committee for European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Detroit Film Theatre: Saturday Animation Club: Howl’s Moving Castle: 3 p.m.
Teenage Sophie finds her life thrown into turmoil when she is swept off her feet by a handsome but mysterious wizard named Howl. As the true power of Howl’s wizardry is revealed, and his relationship with Sophie deepens, she finds herself fighting to protect them both from a dangerous war of sorcery that threatens their world. Tickets: $5.

Detroit Film Theatre: Faust: 7 p.m.
(See April 25 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 9:45 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Family Sunday, April 27
Artist Demonstration: Graem Whyte: Noon–4 p.m.
Graem Whyte discusses and modifies his large scale interactive pieces created to enhance the infrastructural systems of Popps Packing, an arts compound in northwestern Hamtramck.

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Buddy Budson: 1–4 p.m. 
Pianist Buddy Budson performs jazz and pop standards.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Last of the Unjust: 1 p.m.
In this exploration of contested history, Holocaust documentarian Claude Lanzmann (Shoah) revisits a 1975 interview, never made public before, with Benjamin Murmelstein, the Viennese rabbi who worked with Adolf Eichmann to arrange the emigration of 120,000 Jews, an ethically thorny collaboration that saved many lives, landed Murmelstein in prison and made him an endlessly controversial figure. In French and German with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Faust: 6 p.m.
(See April 25 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Viva La Liberta: 8:30 p.m.
Enrico Oliveri is a man of the left, and secretary of the main opposition party. Challenged during a congress and defeated by a recent poll, he takes a break and leaves behind his wife, home, country and party. Unbeknownst to Enrico, in his absence he is replaced with his twin brother Giovanni, a professor of philosophy who has serious problems of his own. In Italian with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17, and free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties and DIA members. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.