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Here Comes the Bride (and Groom)—Wedding Receptions now Available at Detroit Institute of Arts

Monday, July 20, 2009

July 25 reception first ever in museum’s 124-year history

July 20, 2009 (Detroit)—The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) is now in the business of renting some of its most beautiful rooms for wedding receptions. While the DIA has been renting spaces for corporate, foundation and other organizations’ events for years, this is the first time in its 124-year history that the public can book the museum for a wedding reception. 
      The museum has been exploring ways to broaden its revenue stream. While wedding receptions were one option on the table, the DIA is going gently into the new venture. “This is something completely new for the museum,” said Elliott Broom, DIA vice president of Museum Operations. “We know from the calls we get that the DIA is a coveted venue for wedding receptions, but because of the potential wear-and-tear on the museum, we will ease into this very gingerly.”
      Spaces offered include the Walter B. Ford II Great Hall (300-500 people), Rivera Court (150-250 people), Kresge Court (150-200 people) and Prentis Court (200-300 people). Rates for receptions vary, depending on menu choices and spaces requested.
      The first reception will take place Saturday, July 25, with dinner in the majestic Great Hall and the reception in the court yard housing the awe-inspiring murals by Diego Rivera. The color scheme includes taupe linens, mocha chairs and green and yellow florals.
      In addition to weddings, the DIA also rents spaces for showers, birthdays, and other celebrations, such as bar and bat mitzvahs and quinceañeras. The museum notes that the actual ceremonies are not allowed, but the celebrations that follow are. For more information, visit www.dia.org or call 313-833-3434.

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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA's collection is known for its quality, range, and depth.

Programs are made possible with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the City of Detroit.

Contact: Pamela Marcil 313-833-7899 pmarcil@dia.org