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Harvest A Great Time In November At The DIA

Monday, October 04, 2004


October 4, 2004 (Detroit)—Fantastic music, fun programs and fascinating talks are all at the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) this November. The DIA is excited to offer the ongoing activities visitors know and love, with the addition of special lectures from world-renowned experts. Also, during the Thanksgiving weekend the DIA offers a great line-up of activities and performances to get visitors into the holiday season. Programs are free with museum admission, unless otherwise noted. Activities denoted with “SLI” are presented with sign-language interpretation.


FRIDAY NIGHTS AT THE DIA
Friday nights in November offer a great time for visitors of all ages. The museum is open until 9 p.m. every Friday. Activities are 6–8:30 p.m., unless otherwise noted.


November 5: Marshall Field’s First Friday
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: The Art of the Book
Create handmade books that are works of art.

World Music Series: Detroit Artist’s Workshop 6:30 & 8 p.m.
Celebrating its 14th anniversary, the Detroit Artist’s Workshop is a collective of musicians, poets, filmmakers and visual artists from the Detroit area. This performance features the Lyman Woodard Ensemble with Larry Nozero, Steve Wood, Ron English and Danny Spencer, and the poetry of John Sinclair, George Tysh, Robin Eichele, Bill Harris and James Semark.

Artist at Work: Julia Dittberner
Using a grid of fabric and thread, Julia Dittberner creates richly colored and intricately patterned quilts on paper.

Drawing in the Galleries for Youth (Ages 6–14)
Artists/instructors help participants create pencil drawings to take home.

Drawing in the Galleries for Adults (Ages 15 and older)
An artist/instructor helps participants create pencil drawings to take home.

Adventures in Drawing (Ages 8 and under, with an adult.)
Children explore creative expression through drawing with assistance from museum instructors.

Greatest Hits Guided Tours 6 & 7:30 p.m.
Tour some of the DIA’s great masterpieces in Highlights of European & American Art and Art of Four Continents & the Ancient World. Each tour is offered at both times.


November 12: Fine Arts Friday
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: The Art of the Book
Create handmade books that are works of art.

Classical Music: Javier Calderón 6:30 & 8 p.m.
Many composers, including the eminent American Alan Hovhaness, have dedicated their music to Javier Calderón, one of the most expressive classical guitarists of our time.

Moving Pictures: Third Annual Detroit Docs International Film Festival
Watch some of the best documentary short-films in the world, including Suckerfish, Tran Scan, and The King and Dick.

Insider’s View: American Landscape Prints
6 & 7:30 p.m.
Join Nancy Sojka, DIA curator of graphic arts, for a talk on prints in the DIA’s collection that reflect American artists’ enduring interest in landscapes.


November 19: Jazz Friday
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: The Art of the Book
Create handmade books that are works of art.

Jazz Music: Gregory Tardy
Tenor saxophonist Gregory Tardy, joined by a rhythm section of virtuosos including George Colligan on piano, Sean Conly on bass and Woody Williams on drums and percussion, performs new jazz for the 21st century.

Drawing in the Galleries for Youth (Ages 6–14)
Artists/instructors help participants create pencil drawings to take home.

Drawing in the Galleries for Adults (Ages 15 and older)
An artist/instructor helps participants create pencil drawings to take home.

Adventures in Drawing (Ages 8 and under, with an adult)
Children explore creative expression through drawing with assistance from museum instructors.

Greatest Hits Guided Tours
6 & 7:30 p.m.
Tour some of the DIA’s great masterpieces in Highlights of European & American Art and Art of Four Continents & the Ancient World. Each tour is offered at both times.


November 26: Family Friday
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: The Art of the Book
Create handmade books that are works of art.

Family Performance: Moscow Boys Choir 6 & 7:30 p.m.
Founded in 1957, the Moscow Boys Choir is the most prestigious all-boys choir in Russia. Under the direction of choirmaster Leonid Baklushin, these performers have enchanted audiences throughout the world.

Storytelling: Soulworks 2 6:30 & 8 p.m.
Steven Holl’s original tales celebrate things and ideas that are often hidden and overlooked, whether it is the discovery of learning to ride a motorcycle, the heroism of the family dog or the sinister subtlety of racism.

Greatest Hits Guided Tours 6 & 7:30 p.m.
Tour some of the DIA’s great masterpieces in Highlights of European & American Art and Art of Four Continents & the Ancient World. Each tour is offered at both times.



SATURDAY PROGRAMS

Every Saturday
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: Metal Medallions Noon–4 p.m.
Learn the difference between “repousse” and “chasing” while creating a medallion using these metalworking techniques.

Saturday, November 6
Greatest Hit of the Month 2 p.m.
Jennifer Czajkowski, DIA associate educator, discusses the political and artistic intrigue behind Agnolo Bronzino’s portrait Eleonora of Toledo and comments on the intricate dress Eleonora is wearing.

Saturday, November 13
Teacher Workshop: The Rouge Revisited 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Begin at the DIA and tour the Detroit Industry murals by Diego Rivera and the exhibition The Photography of Charles Sheeler: American Modernist. In the afternoon, drive to The Henry Ford in Dearborn and take the new Rouge Factory Tour. Teaching suggestions and written resources from both museums will be provided. All admissions are covered by the class fee. Non-members: $57.50; DIA or The Henry Ford members: $47.50; Student teachers: $32.50. To register, call 313.833.4249
.
Studio Class for Ages 5–8: It’s about Balance 10 a.m.–noon
Use art materials and found objects to create mobiles that balance and move. Members: $10 per child and per adult; Non-members: $12 per child and per adult. To register, call 313.833.4249.

The Invention of Illusion: Sheeler and the Industrial Revolution
1–4 p.m.
Mini course offered on November 13 & 20
The "invention of illusion," makes reference to constructed work and to the use of photography by the modernist photographers, like Charles Sheeler, to transform their subjects through the camera lens. The "industrial revolution," refers to the period in time where both Sheeler and contemporary photographers like Carlos Diaz has taken/borrowed subject matter for their own work. This two-part mini-course will examine the work of modernist and contemporary photographers with an emphasis on the work and influences of Charles Sheeler. Non-members: $40; Members and students $32. To register, call 313.833.4249.

Storytelling: The Art of Folktales 2 p.m. (SLI)
Storyteller Sumarah Karen Smith presents a lively program of multicultural stories from around the world.

Under the Stars XXV 6:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m.
Under the Stars, one of Detroit’s grandest annual events that benefits the DIA, celebrates its 25th anniversary with an elegant evening of cocktails, dinner, desserts and dancing. Tickets are $400 for patrons; $7,000 for a corporate table of 12. For more information, call 313.833.7967.


Saturday, November 20
Workshop: Celebrating Diversity with VSA Arts 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
VSA Arts of Michigan (formerly Very Special Arts) enables people with disabilities to learn through the arts. Participants in this workshop for elementary and home-school educators are invited to experience hands-on art activities and strategies for including students with different learning modalities in their teaching. Members: $40; Non-members: $50; Student teachers: $25. To register, call 313.833.4249.

Artist Demonstration: Robert William Clark Noon–4 p.m.
Artist Robert William Clark constructs one of his found-object assemblages inspired by the urban landscape of popular Detroit landmarks.

The Invention of Illusion: Sheeler and the Industrial Revolution 1–4 p.m.
Mini course offered on November 13 & 20
The "invention of illusion," makes reference to constructed work and to the use of photography by the modernist photographers, like Charles Sheeler, to transform their subjects through the camera lens. The "industrial revolution," refers to the period in time where both Sheeler and contemporary photographers like Carlos Diaz has taken/borrowed subject matter for their own work. This two-part mini-course will examine the work of modernist and contemporary photographers with an emphasis on the work and influences of Charles Sheeler. Non-members: $40; Members and students $32. To register, call 313.833.4249.


Saturday, November 27
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: Puppets Noon–4 p.m.
Make your own puppet out of a variety of materials.

Performance: Moscow Boys Choir 1 p.m.
Founded in 1957, the Moscow Boys Choir is the most prestigious all-boys choir in Russia. Under the direction of choirmaster Leonid Baklushin, these performers have enchanted audiences throughout the world.

Puppet Performance: Wonderful Whirl of Puppets
3 p.m.
Marilyn Price combines storytelling and puppetry to weave a finely crafted repertoire of stories ranging from traditional folktales to original fables. Price uses different types of puppets and often amazes audiences by animating common household objects.



SUNDAY PROGRAMS

Sunday, November 7
Brunch with Bach: Cameron Smith 11 a.m.
Pianist Cameron Smith has captivated audiences internationally with his unique ability to combine style with exquisite dexterity. Tickets are $22 for adults and $11 for children ages 5-–12. To purchase tickets, call 313.833.4005.

Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: Creative Paperworks Noon–4 p.m.
Have fun making paper pop-up cards.

Storytelling: The Art of Folktales 2 p.m.
Sumarah Karen Smith presents a lively program of multicultural stories from around the world.


Sunday, November 14
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: Creative Paperworks Noon–4 p.m.
Have fun making paper pop-up cards.

Artist’s Choice: Robert Wilbert 2 p.m. (SLI)
Detroit artist Robert Wilbert talks about the works in the museum that have influenced his paintings, which can be found in many local collections, including the DIA’s.


Sunday, November 21
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: Creative Paperworks Noon–4 p.m.
Have fun making paper pop-up cards.

NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt 1 p.m.
Staff from the NAMES Project will assist in making a panel for the Quilt as a tribute to someone who has died of AIDS. Bring materials to work on a panel or just come with ideas.

Storytelling: The Art of Folktales 2 p.m.
Sumarah Karen Smith presents a lively program of multicultural stories from around the world.

Community Choice 2 p.m.
Join Linda Margolin, DIA associate educator, for a discussion on works in the Native American gallery.

Lecture: The Centre d’Art and the Evolution of Haitian Art 2 p.m.
Jerry Philogene, art historian and visiting lecturer at Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York, discusses the Centre d’Art, an art school, gallery and meeting place for artists and culturally minded individuals established in Haiti in 1944. The Centre d’Art was instrumental in introducing Haitian art and culture to American and European audiences from 1945 to 1970. Several Haitian artists represented in the DIA’s collection, including Philomé Obin and Jasmin Joseph, were associated with the center and will be featured in the talk.


Sunday, November 28
Drop-in Workshop for All Ages: Puppets Noon–4 p.m.
Make your own puppet out of a variety of materials.

Puppet Performance: Wonderful Whirl of Puppets 2 p.m.
Marilyn Price combines storytelling and puppetry to weave a finely crafted repertoire of stories ranging from traditional folktales to original fables. Price uses different types of puppets and often amazes audiences by animating common household objects.



SPECIAL WEEKDAY PROGRAMS

Studio Class: Calligraphy for Beginners (Ages 15 and older) 6:30–8:30 p.m.
Thursdays, November 4, 11 and 18, December, 2, 9 and 16
Learn the basics of calligraphy, the art of beautiful writing. Members: $120; Non-members: $144; Plus $15 materials fee. To register, call 313.833.4249.


Thursday, November 11
Curator’s Lecture: Laura Hoptman Discusses the Carnegie International 7 p.m.
Laura Hoptman, curator of contemporary art at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and organizing curator of this year’s Carnegie International, discusses the Carnegie International exhibition, on view in Pittsburgh through March 20, 2005. The exhibition, North America’s preeminent survey of international contemporary art, features more than 400 works by 38 artists and broadly investigates the “ultimate” of what it is to be a human being in today’s world.


Thursday, November 18
Studio Class for Home-School Students: Self-Portraits (Ages 9–12, adult/parent accompaniment optional) 2–4 p.m.
Make a work of art about a subject you know very well—yourself. Members: $10 per child and per adult; Non-members: $12 per child and per adult. To register, call 313.833.4249.



EXHIBITIONS

The Photography of Charles Sheeler: American Modernist

Through December 5

This exhibition is the first major retrospective to focus exclusively on the photographic work of Charles Sheeler, one of the master photographers of the 20th century. Featured are more than 100 rare prints from his major series, including legendary views of the Ford Motor Company’s River Rouge complex, commissioned by Edsel Ford in 1927; images of his house and barns in Doylestown, Pennsylvania from 1916 to 1917; stills from the 1920 film Manhatta; photographs of Chartres Cathedral from 1929; and several images of American industry made for Fortune magazine in the 1930s. This exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. All photographs were drawn from The Lane Collection. In Detroit, the exhibition is sponsored by Dow Automotive.

This Land Is Your Land: American Landscape Prints
October 27, 2004–January 30, 2005

The diverse regions of the United States are illustrated in approximately 100 19th- and 20th-century prints in all media. Large selections from three series that have never been on view at the DIA include John Hill’s Picturesque Views of American Scenery from 1821, George Elbert Burr’s Etchings of the Desert from 1921 and Alex Katz’s Landscapes from 2000. Visitors will also be able to see an aspect of the printmaking process: the Hill series consists of multiple states of the same images that illustrate their development from basic etching, to the addition of aquatint and the application of sophisticated hand-coloring to the final proofs. Rounding out the exhibition are individual prints by such artists as Mary Nimmo Moran, Grant Wood, Childe Hassam, Stow Wengenroth, Richard Diebenkorn and Joan Mitchell.