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March Activities at Detroit Institute of Arts—Japanese Girl’s Day, Movies and More - Artist demonstrations, live music, Fakes, Forgeries and Mysteries also part of the fun

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

(Detroit)—Family performances, potter’s wheel classes and drop-in workshops are just a few of the activities offered in March. Visitors can also enjoy great live music and the exhibitions Fakes, Forgeries, and Mysteries and An Intuitive Eye: André Kertész Photographs, 1914–1969. The exhibition It’s a Zoo in Here! Prints and Drawings of Animals opens March 23.

Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Wednesdays–Thursdays, 1 p.m.; Fridays, 1, 6 & 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional, and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4–6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, 6–9 p.m. – IT’S IN THE BAG! Paper Bag Sculpture: Make a paper bag sculpture using a variety of traditional and non traditional art making materials.
Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m. – Islamic Decoupage: In Islamic culture, the word decoupage refers to works of art that are finely cut from paper or leather. Make a fun version using colorful papers and decorative edged scissors.
Sundays, Noon–4 p.m. – Kites: Create a simple kite using paper, ribbon, string and markers. Then learn some basic kite safety tips.

Friday Night Live, March 4
Music: (please visit www.dia.org for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Kawasaki’s Rose: 7 p.m.
This film from the Czech Republic considers the ways in which the past never stops informing the present, and how professional or personal success can depend upon a single, well-placed morsel of information, be it true or false. In Czech with English subtitles. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Saturday, March 5
Detroit Film Theatre: The Red Chapel
: 4 p.m.
Denmark launches an assault on North Korea in this must-be-seen-to-be-believed documentary that crosses The Colbert Report with Borat. In Danish and Korean with English subtitles. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp.  Free with museum admission and for DIA members; $5 for general public without museum admission.

Detroit Film Theatre: Kawasaki’s Rose: 7 p.m. (see March 4 for description)

Family Sunday, March 6
Class: Potter’s Wheel for Adults & Children:
(ages 5-8 must be with an adult): 10–11 a.m., 11 a.m.–noon, 1–2 p.m. and 2–3 p.m.
Try the potter’s wheel in this small class for absolute beginners, complete with plenty of individual guidance. Each person gets to use his or her own wheel with one hour of hands-on clay time. Projects will be fired for pick-up at a later date. Sessions limited to five students. Members $12, non-members $16. To register, email registration@dia.org or call (313) 833-4249.

Artist Demonstration: Japanese Girl’s Day: Noon–4 p.m.
Japanese Girl’s Day (Hinamatsuri) will feature demonstrations of flower arranging (ikebana), tea ceremony, gift-wrapping using furoshiki (traditional wrapping cloths), and kimono sash tying. Hina dolls, ornamental dolls representing royalty, attendants and others in traditional court dress, will also be on display.

Detroit Film Theatre: Kawasaki’s Rose: 2 p.m. (see March 4 for description)

Friday Night Live, March 11
Music:
(please visit www.dia.org for details)

Lecture: Velázquez’s Trips to Italy: 6:30 p.m.
With an extraordinary intellectual background and a superior painting technique, Diego Velázquez was a unique master in 17th-century Spain. Painter to King Philip IV and his courtier, Velázquez traveled twice to Italy under the auspices of the Spanish crown being the first to study and the second to acquire works of art for the royal collection. Salvador Salort-Pons, associate curator of European paintings, explores Velázquez’s life in Italy and the crucial influence of Italian art on both his work and the king’s collection.

Detroit Film Theatre: Marwencol: 7 p.m.
Mark Hogancamp suffered brain damage and severe injuries from a brutal attack, and when he came out of a coma, had little memory of his previous life. He could not afford therapy, so he created his own by building “Marwencol,” a 1/6th scale town populated with dolls of friends, family and his attackers. Through photographs, he turned the figures into characters in an epic story of longing, jealousy and revenge, with his alter ego as the hero. When a prestigious art gallery discovered his photos, his homemade therapy suddenly became “Art,” forcing him to choose between the safety of his fictional town and the real world. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Family Sunday, March 13
Artist Demonstration: Painting: Noon–4 p.m.
Artist Julie Sabit depicts the natural gestures of people relating to each other and their surroundings. She especially prefers those engaged in outdoor, leisure-time activities such as resting on a beach, flying kites or fishing. She often travels and upon returning home tries to recapture the flavor of the people and places she’s seen.

Lecture: The Africans of India: History, Culture, and the Arts: 2 p.m.
Africans in India, known as Siddis, have lived and worked in India for almost 2000 years, contributing to the culture and arts in countless ways. Henry John Drewal, professor of art history at the University of Wisconsin, discusses the African individuals and communities that have helped shape the history and culture of India from the 17th century to the present.

Detroit Film Theatre: Marwencol: 2 p.m. (see March 11 for description)

Friday Night Live, March 18
Music: Chinese White Bicycles, Robyn Hitchcock and Joe Boyd
: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Legendary record producer and author Joe Boyd collaborates with musical icon Robyn Hitchcock on memories and music from rock music’s golden days. Joe Boyd will read from his book White Bicycles, which chronicles the days when he was producing music by Pink Floyd, Nick Drake and Fairport Convention, while Robyn Hitchcock performs songs by these artists.

Lecture: Jinns, Images of Jinns and Medicine in Contemporary Yemen: 6:30 p.m.
Magical medicine is used in some traditional parts of the Islamic world to confront three principal causes of diseases: the evil eye, sorcery and jinns (genies). A manuscript found in Yemen contains rare images of kings from various jinn tribes that are more than mere illustrations. Anne Regourd, researcher at the French National Center for Scientific Research, demonstrates that these images represent part of magical texts used for chasing away jinns in cases where individuals are thought to be possessed.

Detroit Film Theatre: Poetry: 7 p.m.
Mija, a proper, 60-ish woman facing a difficult medical diagnosis, undergoes an unexpected and remarkable transformation after taking a poetry class. Living with her sullen, adolescent grandson, Mija is awaiting inspiration from her muses when she comes to a realization about the boy, and decides to take action. In Korean with English subtitles. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp.  Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Kawasaki’s Rose: 9:30 p.m. (see March 4 for description)

Saturday, March 19
Detroit Film Theatre: The Cameraman
: 4 p.m.
Buster Keaton reached a pinnacle with his 1928 The Cameraman, one of his last silent films and one of his best. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp.  Free with museum admission and for DIA members; $5 for general public without museum admission.

Detroit Film Theatre: Poetry: 7 p.m. (see March 18 for description)

Detroit Film Theatre: Kawasaki’s Rose: 9:30 p.m. (see March 4 for description)

Family Sunday, March 20
Class: Potter’s Wheel Workshop
: (adults only): 1–4 p.m.
Enjoy an introductory potter’s wheel experience in this hands-on class that includes individual guidance and demonstrations. Projects will be fired for pick-up at a later date. Class size limited to 12 students. Members $36, non-members $48. To register, email registration@dia.org or call (313) 833-4249.

Family Performance: The Fisherman and His Wife: 2 p.m.
The fisherman frees an enchanted fish he has snagged with his nets. His wishes are granted in return for the fish's freedom. The fisherman’s wife takes full advantage of this deal, wishing for everything there is to desire. She just may get what she deserves in this Fantasy E-Fex Puppets production.

Detroit Film Theatre: Poetry: 2 p.m. (see March 18 for description)

Detroit Film Theatre: Kawasaki’s Rose: 4:30 p.m. (see March 4 for description)

Friday Night Live, March 25
Music: Uncommon Temperament
: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Uncommon Temperament is a collective of musicians that brings a bold new approach to performing Baroque music. They are known for their daring programming and historically accurate performances in unique venues.

Lecture: They Are All Indispensable: The Ubiquitous Nature of Printed Images: 7 p.m.
Endi Poskovic, associate professor of art at University of Michigan, employs classic Japanese techniques to make woodcuts invoking influences as disparate as devotional pictures, early cinema and Eastern European propaganda posters. He speaks about his interest in issues of displacement, shifting cultural identities, environmental transformation and alienation, which he often couches in scenes reminiscent of youthful whimsy and playful fantasy.

Detroit Film Theatre: Twelve Thirty: 7 p.m.
Twelve Thirty is about the emotional dynamics of relationships, the roles of its characters as manipulators and seducers, and the exact point at which the lines between right and wrong begin to blur. Friday’s performance will be followed by a Q and A with director Jeff Lipsky. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Poetry: 10 p.m. (see March 18 for description)

Saturday, March 26
Detroit Film Theatre: The Battleship Potemkin
: 4 p.m.
This 1925 film from the USSR depicts a 1905 mutiny over intolerable shipboard conditions—one that sparked more uprisings, culminating in the Russian Revolution. It reinvented the art of editing and redefined its power to overwhelm audiences. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp.  Free with museum admission and for DIA members; $5 for general public without museum admission.

Detroit Film Theatre: Twelve Thirty: 7 p.m. (see March 25 for description)

Detroit Film Theatre: Poetry: 9:30 p.m. (see March 18 for description)

Family Sunday, March 27
Storytelling: Dawn Daniels:
2 p.m.
Dawn Daniels brings to life tales of gutsy girls and some wild, wacky and wise women. 

Detroit Film Theatre: Twelve Thirty: 2 p.m. (see March 25 for description)

Detroit Film Theatre: Poetry: 4:30 p.m. (see March 18 for description)

Thursday, March 31
Lecture: Andrea Zittel:
7 p.m.
Andrea Zittel blurs the lines between art and life as she creates modular living spaces and clothing that reconsider our domestic environments. Zittel explores the human need for order, noting that architectural space reflects social organization and contemporary perceptions of freedom and personal liberation.

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6-17, and free for DIA members. For membership information call 313-833-7971.
 
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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA's collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. As the DIA celebrates its 125th anniversary in 2010, it does so with renewed commitment to its visitor-centered experience and to its mission of creating opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible in part with support from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, National Endowment for the Arts and the City of Detroit.
 

Contact: Pamela Marcil (313) 833-7899 pmarcil@dia.org