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Museum Mystery Tours part of October Fun at Detroit Institute of Arts - Detroit Revealed: Photographs 2000-2010 opens Oct. 16

Monday, September 12, 2011

(Detroit)—Artist demonstrations, puppet shows, live music, and the popular Museum Mystery Tours are just some of the Detroit Institute of Arts' (DIA) October offerings. "Canstruction," an unusual display of sculptures made of canned goods will be on view from Oct. 26 to Oct. 30, and the exhibition Detroit Revealed: Photographs 2000-2010 opens October 16.

Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Wednesdays–Thursdays, 1 p.m.; Fridays, 1, 6, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1, 3 p.m.
Drop-In Workshops (all ages):

Fridays, 6–9 p.m.; Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m.; Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.
Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m.; Sundays, Noon–4 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4–6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, 6–9 p.m. – Sugar Skulls: Decorate sugar skulls and learn how they are used for Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexican and Mexican-American communities.
Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m. – You’ve Been Framed: Using a variety of art-making materials, decorate a 5x7" frame made from corrugated board.
Sundays, Noon–4 p.m. – Games People Play: Tic Tack Toe Boards: Design your own game board then use a wide range of materials to make your playing pieces.

Saturday, October 1
Lecture: European Art at the DIA: Celebrating 125 Years and Beyond: 2 p.m.
Yao-Fen You, DIA assistance curator of European sculpture, surveys the history of the museum's European art collection, focusing on pivotal moments in making the collection a stronghold of European art in North America. Sponsored by Visiting Committee for European Sculpture and Decorative Arts.

Detroit Film Theatre: On the Bowery: 4 p.m.
The Oscar-nominated On the Bowery is a powerful chronicle of three days on New York's skid row. The film is a pioneering blend of documentary/fiction, and an American masterpiece. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Mozart’s Sister: 7 p.m.
Mozart's Sister is a re-imagined account of the early life of Maria Anna “Nannerl” Mozart, five years older than Wolfgang and a musical prodigy. Approaching marriageable age and forbidden to play or compose, Nannerl chafes at the limitations imposed on her gender. But a friendship with the son and daughter of Louis XV offers her ways to challenge the sexual and social order. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Where Soldiers Come From: 9:30 p.m.
After graduating from high school in the Upper Peninsula town of Hancock, Michigan, best friends Dominic and Cole were enticed by a $20,000 signing bonus to join the National Guard. Persuading friends to join them, they were sent to Afghanistan. This award-winning documentary examines the war’s effect on parents, loved ones and the whole community when young people go off to fight. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Family Sunday, October 2
Sunday Music Bar: Moran Katz and Amy Yang: 1 & 3 p.m.
Praised for her magnificent color, agility and breath control, clarinetist Moran Katz plays the music of Johannes Brahms, Robert Schumann and Alban Berg. She is joined by pianist Amy Yang.

Puppet Performance: Salsa Cinderella: 2 p.m.
Peppers, onion, garlic and tomatoes make up the ingredients of this spicy cast. The salsa thickens when the stubborn Prince refuses to change. His way of dancing is the only way he recognizes—until the big Palace Fiesta. A musical score by John Alexander will have you wanting to mambo in the aisles. A dazzling array of rod and shadow puppets join in the quest to find the foot that fits a simple sandal.

Detroit Film Theatre: Mozart’s Sister: 2 p.m.
(see October 1 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Where Soldiers Come From: 4:30 p.m.
(see October 1 for details)

Thursday, October 6
Detroit Film Theatre: The Mexican Cinema: Cinematography and Literature: 7 p.m.
In 1943, Romulo Gallegos adapted his celebrated novel Doña Bárbera for director Fernando de Fuentes. The tale of a young law school graduate who becomes the romantic obsession of beautiful Venezuelan landowner is brought to vivid life through the radiant images of cinematographer Alex Phillips. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Admission Free.

Friday Night Live, October 7
Music: Lightning Love: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Lightning Love is an indie-rock band who made a nice splash with their self-released debut album, November Birthday. They’ve since won the Best Pop Act in 2009 and were chosen to represent the Midwest in the 2011 Billboard Battle of the Bands.

Detroit Film Theatre: City of Life and Death: 7 p.m.
City of Life and Death is a brilliantly crafted portrait of life during wartime. In 1937, the Imperial Japanese Army laid siege to the Chinese capital of Nanking, beginning a reign of terror that killed as many as 300,000 civilians, an infamous tragedy now referred to as the Rape of Nanking. This is the first big-budget fiction film by the Chinese to deal with this seminal event. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Mozart’s Sister: 9:45 p.m.
(see October 1 for details)

Saturday, October 8
Detroit Film Theatre: DFT 101: Once Upon a Time in the West: 3 p.m.
The myths of the American west reverberate with such resonance in this fantastic vision of revenge and redemption, set in a land undergoing convulsive change. Jason Robards, Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale and Henry Fonda are the protagonists forging a new future from the Old West. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Free with museum admission and for DIA members; $5 for general public without museum admission.

Detroit Film Theatre: City of Life and Death: 7 p.m.
(see October 7 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Mozart’s Sister: 9:45 p.m.
(see October 1 for details)

Family Sunday, October 9 – Ford Free Sunday
Sunday Music Bar: Hawks & Owls: 1 & 3 p.m.
Led by award-winning fiddler, mandolinist and flatpicked guitarist Bruce Ling, this band plays a mix of acoustic-based country blues, bluegrass and early swing, along with Appalachian, Irish and original fiddle tunes and songs.

Storytelling: Pat Roan Judd’s Heroic Folks: 2 p.m.
Roan Judd combines mime, puppetry, Irish drumming, acting and dialects to perform tales of heroic folks gifted with the imagination to solve complicated problems. She draws from her cultural background—Native American, Scots-Irish, Italian and French—and respectfully borrows from other cultures, oral tradition and the written word.

Detroit Film Theatre: City of Life and Death: 2 p.m.
(see October 7 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Mozart’s Sister: 4:45 p.m.
(see October 1 for details)

Tuesday, October 11
Detroit Film Theatre: Urbanized: 7 p.m.
Urbanized is a documentary about the design of cities such as Detroit, and the strategies behind urban design discussed by the world’s foremost architects, planners, policymakers, builders, and thinkers. It is the third part of Gary Hustwit’s trilogy, which includes Helvetica and Objectified, and is shown in conjunction with Detroit Revealed: Photographs 2000-2010, which opens Oct. 16. Director Gary Hustwit will introduce the film and discuss it afterwards with the audience. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Thursday, October 13
Detroit Film Theatre: The Mexican Cinema: Luis Buñuel: 7 p.m.
During the years he lived and worked in Mexico, Spain's surrealist director Luis Buñuel created some of his most memorable works. In 1951’s Subida al Cielo (aka Mexican Bus Ride) a young man travels to look after his late mother’s estate. His bus ride is far from uneventful; among the distractions is a female passenger set on seducing him. 1953's La Ilusion Viaja en Tranvia (Illusion Travels by Streetcar) involves tram workers who steal their own streetcar. In Spanish with English subtitles. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Admission Free.

Friday Night Live, October 14
Music: Stephane Wrembel: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Jazz guitarist and Django Reinhardt specialist Stephane Wrembel calls his music "gypsy jam," a hybrid of world music dominated by his gypsy guitar. He will perform music from his forthcoming CD, including his song “Bistro Fada” from Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris. Also performing will be Dave Speranza (bass), Davis Langlois (washboard), Nick Anderson (drums) and Koran Hasanagic (rhythm guitar).

Detroit Film Theatre: Passione: 7 p.m.
John Turturro’s colorful, sexy ode to the music and people of Naples was “rapturously received” (Variety) and interrupted by “spontaneous outbreaks of applause” (Sight & Sound) in Italy, where it has played for six months, its soundtrack on the charts for seven. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: DFT 101: The Fleischer Studios, A Musical Legacy: 4 p.m.
Whet your musical appetite with this compilation of vintage musical cartoons from the risqué Betty Boopss. Boop's home, the legendary Fleischer Animation Studios. The boop-oop-a-doop girl herself will appear on screen in some of her memorable performances with Cab Calloway. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Free with museum admission and for DIA members; $5 for general public without museum admission.

Detroit Film Theatre: City of Life and Death: 9:30 p.m.
(see October 7 for details)

Saturday, October 15
Detroit Film Theatre: Passione: 7 p.m.
(see October 14 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: City of Life and Death: 9:30 p.m.
(see October 7 for details)

Family Sunday, October 16
Artist Demonstration: Howard Fridson’s Book Illustration: Noon–4 p.m.
Artist and author Howard Fridson recreates the process of illustrating his book Our Family Treasure. Fridson studied art at Wayne State University where he drew a comic strip for the school newspaper called “The Adventures of Captain Bopper. Since then, he has continued to paint and has illustrated books including Maya’s First Rose by Martin Scot Kosins.

African Art Recognition Award and Lecture: White, Gold, Black Hands: Kongo Ivory Sculpture: 2 p.m.
Between 1500 and 1900, the Kongo Kingdom of Central Africa became famous for ivory sculpture, which it produced specifically for European clients. Recognition Award honoree Marc Félix examines this long-standing Kongo tradition. Sponsored by Friends of African and African American Art.

Detroit Film Theatre: Passione: 2 p.m.
(see October 14 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: City of Life and Death: 4:30 p.m.
(see October 7 for details)

Wednesday, October 19
Lecture: Working with Diego Rivera: Recollections by Rina Lazo and Arturo Garcia Bustos: 6:30 p.m.
As young artists in Mexico, Rina Lazo and her husband Arturo Garcia Bustos studied and worked with Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. They talk about their lives, their time with Rivera and Kahlo and their work before opening the floor to questions. Co-sponsored by the Consulate of Mexico in Detroit, the United Auto Worker and Associates of the American Wing.

Friday Night Live, October 21
Music: Joel Harrison Septet: 7 & 8:30 a.m.
The Joel Harrison Septet performs music from the Singularity jazz project, commissioned by Chamber Music America’s “New Works” program. Harrison merges his wealth of experience in jazz and world styles with his longstanding interest in contemporary composition to create a sound that is often described as “chamber jazz.” Musicians include Chris Howes (violin), Donny McCaslin (saxophone), Dana Leong (cello), Gary Versace (piano), Stephan Crump (bass) and Clarence Penn (drums).

Detroit Film Theatre: La Rafle (The Round-Up): 7 p.m.
In 1942 Paris, children wearing yellow stars play in the streets, oblivious to the darkness spreading over Nazi-occupied France. Hitler demands that the French government round up its Jews and collaborators quickly and efficiently put the plan into motion. Soon Paris’s Jews, among them 4,000 children, are rounded up and sent on a road with no return. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Passione: 9:30 p.m.
(see October 14 for details)

Saturday, October 22
Detroit Film Theatre: A Woman Like That: 1 p.m.
Filmmaker Ellen Weissbrod merged her own coming-of-middle-age story with her pursuit of the truths behind the legends about 17th century female painter Artemisia Gentileschi, represented in the DIA collection by her monumental painting Judith with the Head of Holofernes. A Woman Like That is a freewheeling tribute to an artist whose bold life and inspiring message leap across centuries. Presented by the Friends of Detroit Film Theatre and DIA European Paintings Council. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: DFT 101: Foolish Wives: 4 p.m.
The 1922 Foolish Wives is the legendary Erich von Stroheim's epic-scale account of an American diplomat's wife who falls under the spell of a conniving, phony Russian count. This one-of-a-kind film remains as fascinating today as when it opened. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Free with museum admission and for DIA members; $5 for general public without museum admission.

Detroit Film Theatre: La Rafle (The Round-Up): 7 p.m.
(see October 21 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Passione: 9:30 p.m.
(see October 14 for details)

Family Sunday, October 23
Sunday Music Bar: Marie Meirelles plays Franz Liszt: 1 & 3 p.m.
Pianist Maria Meirelles performs the music of Franz Liszt in celebration of the bicentennial of the composer’s birth.

Family Performance: Mr. Seley: 2 p.m.
Outgrown Raffi? Graduate to songs written and performed by Birmingham teacher Mr. Seley. Learn songs from his CD Cupcakeasaurus! and sing along with old favorites.

Lecture: What’s in the Line: History, Development, and Styles of Arabic/Islamic Calligraphy: 2 p.m.
Nihad Dukhan discusses the intricate geometry rhythm and visual impact of Islamic calligraphy, while touching on its philosophical aspects and intimate relationship of the Qur’an. Sponsored by Asian and Islamic Forum.

Detroit Film Theatre: La Rafle (The Round-Up): 2 p.m.
(see October 21 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Passione: 4:30 p.m.
(see October 14 for details)

Wednesday–Sunday, October 26–30
Canstruction: On view during museum hours
Sponsored by the American Institute of Architects, Canstruction is a juried competition for metro Detroit architects, engineers and designers to build large-scale sculptures entirely constructed of canned fruits and vegetables. The completed works will be on display in Rivera Court for a week, and afterwards will be disassembled and donated to Gleaner’s Community Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan.

Thursday, October 27
Lecture: Photography with Peter Galassi: 7 p.m.
Peter Galassi, writer, scholar and curator of more than 40 exhibitions, reflects on the Museum of Modern Art’s 1967 exhibition New Documents, curated by his predecessor John Szarkowski, and the reemergence of the modernist tradition in work by photographers Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand and Lee Friedlander, among others. Sponsored by Forum for Prints, Drawings, and Photographs.

Friday Night Live, October 28
Music: Aerial Angels: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
The Aerial Angels conjure up their dark side with a special Ghost Circus for the Halloween weekend. The Aerial Angels are high-flying circus artists performing feats of grace, beauty and strength on the aerial hoop and aerial silk, acrobatics, fire eating and crack bullwhip target taking.

Detroit Film Theatre: Octubre: 7 p.m.
Octubre follows Clemente, a small-time money-lender living in Lima, who discovers a baby left on his doorstep. The film creates a visionary portrait of the back alleys and tumble-down houses of Lima while introducing unforgettable characters. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Eyes Without a Face: 9:30 p.m.
When a surgeon’s daughter is disfigured in an accident, the doctor and his coldly sinister mistress systematically kidnap young women from the streets of Paris, hoping to successfully graft their faces onto his daughter. This restored version is an elegant classic of the horror genre. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Saturday, October 29
The Museum Mystery Tour: (ages 5 and older, with an adult): 1–4:30 p.m.
Commune with the spirits of long-departed artists in the American galleries and explore secrets about the artists whose work haunts the DIA. You've never seen the galleries like this: eerie lighting and sounds in the dark, but we'll keep it fun and family friendly. Costumes are strongly encouraged.

Detroit Film Theatre: Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors: 4 p.m.
An electrifying folk tale, set in the Carpathian mountains in the 19th century, is the story of a peasant who enters into a loveless marriage as a result of a murderous feud involving his own family and that of the woman he truly loved. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Detroit Film Theatre: Octubre: 7 p.m.
(see October 28 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: El Baron Del Terror (Brainiac): 9:30 p.m.
In the 1950s and '60s, Mexico's Churubusco Studios produced a series of bizarre horror films, including this tale of a 17th-century baron and playboy who, after being burned at the stake, returns 300 years later to take revenge by devouring the brains of his tormentors’ descendants. This low-budget cult favorite will have you gasping and laughing in equal measure. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Family Sunday, October 30
Sunday Music Bar: TBA

The Museum Mystery Tour: (ages 5 and older, with adults): 1–4:30 p.m.
(please see Oct. 29 for details)

Lecture: Sunday in the Park with George–Bellows: 2 p.m.
Best known for his gritty scenes of urban life in early 20th-century New York, George Bellows also painted upper-class leisure. David Curry examines Bellow’s paintings of city parks, paying particular attention to the DIA’s A Day in June. Sponsored by Associates of the American Wing.

Detroit Film Theatre: Octubre: 2 p.m.
(see October 28 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Kwaidan: 4:30 p.m.
This rendering of four ghostly stories of demons, spirits and dreadfully fulfilled curses remains one of the most beautiful and disquieting visions of the supernatural committed to film. For a detailed description, visit www.dia.org/dft/schedule.asp. Tickets: $7.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6-17, and free for DIA members. For membership information call 313-833-7971.

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The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera's world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA's collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from the City of Detroit.

Contact: Pamela Marcil (313) 833-7899 pmarcil@dia.org www.dia.org