Citizen Kane and the Art of Cinematography

(USA/1941-directed by Orson Welles)

Detroit Film Theater curator will present an introduction to this special screening of Citizen Kane, and discuss with audiences the innovative visual elements that distinguish it as a milestone in the development of the art of cinema.

“I don't think any word can explain a man's life,” says one of the searchers through the warehouse of treasures left behind by Charles Foster Kane. Then we get the famous series of shots leading to the closeup of the word “Rosebud” on a sled that has been tossed into a furnace, its paint curling in the flames. We remember that this was Kane's childhood sled, taken from him as he was torn from his family and sent east to boarding school.

"It is one of the miracles of cinema that in 1941 a first-time director; a cynical, hard-drinking writer; an innovative cinematographer, and a group of New York stage and radio actors were given the keys to a studio and total control, and made a masterpiece.” -Roger Ebert (119 min.)

 

 

 

The Detroit Film Theatre is generously supported by Buddy's Pizza and your tri-county millage investment in the DIA.

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