Events

Fantastic Voyage (1966)

Other Dimensions: Fantastic Voyage (1966)

  • Fri, Jun 29
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

An important scientist is attacked, and the resulting brain injury is inoperable – from the outside, at least. The solution: shrink a surgical team down to microscopic size and inject them into his bloodstream, so they can operate from the inside. A great sci-fi concept was somewhat limited by the era’s technology, yet it’s still a fondly remembered, brightly colorful adventure. 

The Prestige (2006)

Other Dimensions: The Prestige (2006)

  • Fri, Jun 29
  • 7:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

After a tragic onstage accident turns them into enemies, two magicians (Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman) become equally obsessed with perfecting a vanishing act, while each sets out to destroy the reputation of the other. This engrossing, underappreciated nineteenth-century drama – which takes a daring turn into sci-fi territory – marked a rewarding change of pace for director Christopher Nolan (Inception, Dunkirk).  

Garrett Davis, Daddy’s Boys

Daddy’s Boys

  • 1 p.m. & 6 p.m. | Sat, Jun 30
  • Detroit Film Theatre

AARP MICHIGAN , in partnership with The Charles Wright Museum of African American History and the DIA will present a play by Garrett Davis that delves into the role of men as fathers, a subject that strikes to the hearts of many.

The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

Robots: The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

  • Sun, Jul 1
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

The wise, humanoid alien named Klaatu arrives in Washington D.C. to deliver a message of universal peace, yet he’s accompanied by the supremely menacing Gort–a robot so deadly he’s capable of “reducing the Earth to a burned-out cinder.”

Fantastic Planet

Adventures and Quests: Fantastic Planet (1973)

  • Tue, Jul 3
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

Set on a distant planet where enslaved humans are the playthings of giant blue native inhabitants, nothing else has ever looked or felt like director René Laloux’s animated marvel Fantastic Planet, a politically minded and visually inventive work of science fiction. This Cannes prizewinner and counterculture classic, with a jazz score by Alain Goraguer, remains a compelling statement against oppression and conformity.  

Alien Encounters: The Thing From Another World (1951)

Alien Encounters: The Thing From Another World (1951)

  • Thu, Jul 5
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

Investigating a mysterious crash at the North Pole, a handful of scientists and Air Force personnel find themselves at war with an alien life form – a humanoid creature made of plant matter that lives on blood and aims to reproduce itself into an invading army.

The Time Machine (1960)

Other Dimensions: The Time Machine (1960)

  • Fri, Jul 6
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

On the last day of 1899, the inventor of a time machine propels himself thousands of years into the future, where he discovers a civilization comprised of lethargic slaves and their cannibal masters, who hide underground. H.G. Wells’ classic tale of man’s past and possible future is one of the most visually rich sci-fi movies of its time. 

Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)

Creatures: Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)

  • Sat, Jul 7
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

Scientists discover an astonishing prehistoric creature – a “gill-man” – deep in the wilds of the Amazon. The creature resists with deadly force when his captors try to bring him to “civilization,” yet he’s strangely unable to resist his attraction to scientific assistant Julia Adams.  

Metropolis

Robots: Metropolis

  • Sun, Jul 8
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

Fritz Lang’s visionary masterpiece, often cited as George Lucas’s favorite film, is the granddaddy of sci-fi movie epics. Much of the drama centers on an up-to-no-good female robot named Maria, whose elegant design became the inspiration for C-3PO a half-century later.

Things to Come

Adventures and Quests: Things to Come (1936)

  • Tue, Jul 10
  • 3:00 PM
  • Detroit Film Theatre

H.G. Wells adapted his own novel for this lavish screen spectacle about the destruction and rebuilding of human society, leaving viewers to ponder questions about rationality, fear, war, human emotion, and the costs and rewards of scientific progress. For its day, Things to Come set a new standard for visual boldness and conceptual daring; it remains an essential work of cinematic science fiction.