Events

"Crying Girl," 1963, Roy Lichtenstein, American; offset lithograph printed in color on off-white wove paper. Detroit Institute of Arts. 

From Camelot to Kent State: Pop Art, 1960-1975

  • Sun, Feb 17 - Sun, Aug 25, 2019
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

From Camelot to Kent State: Pop Art, 1960-1975, includes seventy-three prints, drawings, multiples, and sculpture primarily from the DIA collection.

"Café,​ Paris," 1929, Archibald J. Motley Jr., American; oil on canvas. Museum Purchase, Ernest & Rosemarie Kanzler Foundation Fund. Detroit Institute of Arts. 

Out of the Crate: New Gifts & Purchases

  • Sat, Jun 8 - Sun, Sep 15, 2019
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

DIA Director Salvador Salort-Pons selects the artwork in this gallery that showcases some of the museum’s newest acquisitions.

"The Ball Players," 1871, William Morris Hunt, American; oil on canvas. Detroit Institute of Arts.

Play Ball! Transforming the Game, 1876-2019

  • Sat, Jun 15 - Sun, Sep 15, 2019
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

Celebrate the great American pastime of baseball with a new year of the DIA's continuing series of exhibitions, Play Ball! Baseball at the DIA.

Etude pour "Le Pont de l'Europe" (Study for "Le Pont de l'Europe"), 1876, Gustave Caillebotte, French; oil on canvas. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York. Photograph by Tom Loonan and Brenda Bieger, courtesy of Albright-Knox Art Galler

Humble and Human: Impressionist Era Treasures from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Detroit Institute of Arts, an Exhibition in Honor of Ralph C. Wilson, Jr.

  • Wed, Jun 26 - Sun, Oct 13, 2019
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

A selection of more than forty Impressionist and post-Impressionist treasures from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Detroit Institute of Arts.

An image of four of 2018's colorful Ofrenda altarpieces

Ofrendas: Celebrating el Día de Muertos

  • September 28 - November 10, 2019
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

In celebration of Dia de Muertos, the Detroit Institute of Arts, in partnership with Detroit's Mexican Consulate, invite you to explore a community exhibition of ofrenda altars.

Terra cotta busts of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington, made in the 18th century by Jean-Antoine Houdon

Guests of Honor from the Musée du Louvre: Jean-Antoine Houdon’s Portraits of Americans in the Age of Enlightenment

  • October 6, 2019 - May 3, 2020
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

The Detroit Institute of Arts will present a dossier exhibition featuring two masterworks of French eighteenth-century portrait sculpture lent from the Musée du Louvre.

Jeff Gaydesh, On Anchor Bay, Lake St. Clair

Michigan’s Great Lakes: Photographs by Jeff Gaydash

  • Nov 9, 2019 - May 3, 2020
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

Large-scale photographs of Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior are the subject of this exhibition by Detroit area photographer Jeff Gaydash.

"All Blues," 2008, Allie McGhee, American; mix/canvas. From the private collection of Nettie Seabrooks.

Detroit Collects: Selections of African American Art from Private Collections

  • November 12, 2019 - March 1, 2020
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

Explore the rich history of collecting of African American Art in the Detroit region by private collectors, featuring works by Romare Bearden, Al Loving, Charles McGee and Alison Saar. 

"The Wedding Dance," 1566, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Netherlandish; oil on wood panel. Detroit Institute of Arts.

Bruegel's “The Wedding Dance” Revealed

  • Sat, Dec 14, 2019 - Sun, Aug 30, 2020
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

This exhibition celebrates one of the DIA's most iconic paintings, Pieter Bruegel's The Wedding Dance (1566) on the occasion of the 450th anniversary of the artist's death.

“Alpine Landscape with Deep Valley,” 1555, Jan Duetecum I after Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Netherlandish; etching and engraving printed in black on laid paper. Detroit Institute of Arts.

From Bruegel to Rembrandt: Dutch and Flemish Prints and Drawings from 1500 to 1700

  • Feb 15 - July 26, 2020
  • Detroit Institute of Arts

Starting in the sixteenth-century, Flemish and Dutch artists turned to everyday subjects, describing the landscape and people around them with humor and loving detail.

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